Conservation of forest reindeer

Northern Finland holds several hundred thousand domesticated tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) which form the mainstay of the nomadic Laplander's economy. Some wild specimens of this tundra reindeer are found in Central Norway.However, a much larger wild subspecies, (R.t.fennicus), is found in the northern conifer forest of Finland. The Central Hunters' Union of Finland, in cooperation with the Finnish Government, is in the process of ensuring the long-term conservation and sustainable use of this resource and has asked the Foundation and the CIC for their support. Capture, translocation for restocking and separation of these wild populations from the domestic herds - with which they could hybridize - are being carried out.


Radio-collaring of wolves

Northern Finland holds several hundred thousand domesticated tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) which form the mainstay of the nomadic Laplander's economy. Some wild specimens of this tundra reindeer are found in Central Norway.However, a much larger wild subspecies, (R.t.fennicus), is found in the northern conifer forest of Finland. The Central Hunters' Union of Finland, in cooperation with the Finnish Government, is in the process of ensuring the long-term conservation and sustainable use of this resource and has asked the Foundation and the CIC for their support. Capture, translocation for restocking and separation of these wild populations from the domestic herds - with which they could hybridize - are being carried out.


Roe deer as a game species in suburban forests

Every year, 800,000 persons visit a 1,500 hectare forest entirely surrounded by suburban housing just East of Paris. The forest is managed and hunting of Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) leased by the National Forestry Office. Besides extraction of timber and hunting other activities include biking, horseback riding and strolling on the road network throughout the forest. It was noted that Roe deer population density had decreased by two-thirds in the last few years. The Foundation offered its help in order to elaborate a strategy aiming to reconcile access to the forest by all interested parties with the tranquillity needed in certain places and at certain times for wildlife species to thrive. An important number of Roe deer were captured and equipped with radio-collars in order to monitor their movements, to see how human activities affect the animals' behaviour.


Conservation status

The jaguar (Panthera onça) has been one of the least known of the large cats because of its secretive life in some of the densest jungles of the world. It was listed by CITES in 1973 as endangered throughout its range. However jaguar appeared to be widely present throughout Latin America, from Paraguay through Brazil, all of Central America up to North-East Mexico. It is abundant throughout a large part of its range and is being extensively hunted in all the areas where it coexists with domestic livestock. The Foundation, with the CIC, initiated a Symposium on jaguar in Manaus, Brazil, with the presence of the most reknowned international experts. More than 50 participants, representing Universities, scientific Institutes, Governments and Wildlife Management Departments from the countries concerned, attended the meeting. The meeting agreed that there was no significant poaching of jaguar for the fur trade, that jaguar was a natural resource which deserved to be properly managed, but that suitable funding for such management was generally lacking in the range States. It was suggested that, in view of its success, an approach similar to that used for African leopard (Panthera pardus) be implemented for jaguar: i.e. that of setting hunting quotas, including for trophy hunting, ensuring that financial returns benefit wildlife management agencies as well as landowners and local population.


Emergency rescue of marsh deer

Habitat destruction, illegal hunting and livestock disease have endangered the marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), largest neo-tropical deer, throughout its distribution area.In the state of São Paulo, Brazil, its last habitat in the Rio Tiete Valley was due to be flooded by the Tres Irmaõs hydroelectric dam. The objective was to capture, using a net-gun from a helicopter, and translocate the last free-ranging marsh deer population to a captive breeding center and to private ranches. Two missions were carried out : The first to adjust the capture and tranquilizing technique to the habitat and the species. The second, after the start of flooding, to rescue the remaining animals. Out of a population of about 180 animals, 158 were successfully caught, and training of Brazilian personnel in the technique of helicopter net-gun animal capture was carried out. The future strategy was to be conducted by CESP (São Paulo Electric Company).


 
 

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