Colorado to reintroduce old shark species after locals vote on their favorite animals

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While reintroducing prehistoric freshwater sharks to Colorado’s oft-visited rivers and lakes may seem irresponsible, votes are in and Colorado residents have decided to bring this predator back to the top of the water. . In a close statewide ‘people’s choice’ vote that ultimately pitted the American cheetah against a species of prehistoric shark, the ‘king of the river’ won the tender to be brought back to life.

Believe it or not, sharks once lived in Colorado – just 92 million years ago – and that was one of the main motivating factors behind helping this animal return to the Centenary State. The specific shark species to be reintroduced is the Cladoselachewhich grew to about six feet in length and was known for its muscular jawline.

Editor’s note: Calm down, this article is just an April Fool’s joke. Sharks aren’t coming back to Colorado – at least not to our knowledge. This photo, however, is real, taken in South Africa. Don’t forget, it’s April 1st! Make no more mistake. This is one of two coins from us to watch, both of which have a similar rating, as seen here.

To quote a Boulder voter on this subject: “I look forward to floating down the river alongside the sharks on my next kayaking adventure. Given the shark’s prehistoric presence in the Colorado ecosystem, this reintroduction offers a rare chance for a return to a more natural state of life in an increasingly civilized world.”

While the sharks inhabited Colorado when the landscape was quite different, reintroduction proponents don’t seem worried that changes in the local environment would impact the species.

Some concerns have been raised about whether or not sharks could threaten Colorado’s fish population, with the sport of fishing being a key tourism and source of income for many small towns in the state.

Although these concerns were voiced loudly by vested interests, it was not enough to sway the popular vote and a plan to bring the shark back is currently being worked on by officials, with a reintroduction program that will should start in just one year.

Once the preserved DNA has been used to produce an initial group of adolescent sharks, the plan is to begin the process of reintroduction into high-altitude lakes in Colorado. Crews plan to drop the sharks into the water from an airplane, like the number of fish species currently stocked in remote locations. However, in the case of sharks, planes will be limited to dropping hundreds per mission instead of thousands.

The survival rate of fish stocked via this method is around 99%, according to wildlife officials. It is expected that the added weight of the sharks could lead to speed which means increased casualties when colliding with water.

Will the return of the Colorado Shark bring all the benefits people expect? Or will it add unforeseen risk to the outdoor recreation space? We will have to wait and see.

Editor’s note: Calm down, this article is just an April Fool’s joke. Sharks aren’t coming back to Colorado – at least not to our knowledge. This photo, however, is real, taken in South Africa. Don’t forget, it’s April 1st! Make no more mistakes. This is one of two coins from us to watch, which both have a similar footer, as seen here.

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